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Author Topic: i know i say i never read interviews with bands i like  (Read 3581 times)
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dhex
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« on: April 27, 2010, 10:33:21 AM »

but i lie sometimes.

http://thequietus.com/articles/03717-thee-silver-mt-zion-memorial-orchestra-godspeed-you-black-emperor-efrim-menuck-interview-kollapse-traxionales

for what it's worth i thought kollapse was uninspired; it's a silver mt. zion album sounding like a silver mt. zion album. in that light i'm both jazzed and a bit wary about what a gybe reunion is going to give us, but hopefully i can approach it with no expectations.

however, what i wanted to touch on in brief was this one sentiment that i've seen popping up just about everywhere (including that oft-linked rant by that guy who writes for the village voice about how the internet is making his job too hard): long and short, it's that easy access to music kills music because it makes it too easy, or too dense, or too difficult to wade through without filters. (the economic argument about killing bands and labels, especially indies, because they can't make money is separate and far more easily defended.)

Quote
Parts of your new record have already leaked. How do you feel about that?

EM: I don’t know, it seems like a silly thing to have an opinion about. I mean, what would you do about it. As soon as the CD goes out, someone burns it and it replicates from there. I think it is what it is. I’m disheartened by this whole new future we were supposed to be entering where everything’s filed and ready for whatever digital device you have. I still don’t understand how that’s supposed to lead to a vital and engaged culture of music. I guess what it has done is lead to a more monochromatic culture, and that’s never good. I think it would be a terrible musical culture that, that only involved bands like us, that would also be terrible. You need a broad spectrum of bands. And people, not just fans of music, are getting pushed out of that whole marketplace. I think that’s a sad thing.

i really don't know what to say. this is such the opposite of reality that all i can think of is that it is a general response both to choice overload and, more importantly, to the speed with which trends/scenes/styles/influences now translate. an easy example would be the explosion of dubstep (a localized london phenomenon) into a trans-national one.

perhaps it's a musical buckleyism, standing athwart the music world yelling "slow down, please!"
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dhex
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« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2010, 10:43:20 AM »

this is the village voice guy i referenced above:

http://everetttrue2.blogspot.com/2010/04/this-is-best-fucking-rant-ive-heard-all.html

edit: it's fairly conservative/reactionary, with a dash of "i wish we had better aggregators and less competition". to which the only answer is "tough shit".
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isfet
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« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2010, 10:56:36 AM »

the arguments at hand are, for me, a bit of a conundrum, though.  in some ways, there have absolutely been albums i've downloaded and consumed in an incredibly quick manner.  digested and the moving on from the experience, so to speak.  there have only been a few albums that i keep coming back to, though.

i think the thing we've lost a bit is for an album to grow on you.  or, if it hasn't been lost, it requires a certain amount of discipline.

but at the same time, the influx of music available has made me aware of a lot more stuff than i ever would have been exposed to, otherwise.
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